Reflections on 2018

As 2018 draws to a close, there is a lot to reflect on and consider.

First of all we have the seemingly never ending Brexit discussions and negotiations with the final date for the vote now set for the week of January 11th.

If the vote is ‘no’ as seems to be widely expected, then this opens up another can of worms about the possible options. The BBC produced a very useful decision tree highlighting the possible paths that could be followed after a ‘no’ vote and I think I counted over 20 different combinations when I looked.

On the other hand, if Theresa May is to pull out a surprise ‘yes’ vote, then at least we will have some clarity over the future direction of travel, regardless of your views on the ‘deal’ itself.

It is important to bear in mind that Brexit is very much a UK issue. Markets elsewhere in the world do not seem phased by Brexit or the surrounding game of politics. They have other things on their minds. Talking to an Austrian chap at a recent business coaching event, it was interesting to hear how they see Brexit. Most Austrians, he informed me, simply think we are mad for having initiated the whole process in the first place. Given the resulting chaos – perhaps they are right!

Elsewhere there have been plenty of goings on to keep people occupied and despite the fact that we can’t get away from it here in the UK, Brexit is barely mentioned (nor does it need to be) in some of the other global markets such as the US and China.

Although we have seen some market volatility in the latter part of 2018, this is simply a return to ‘normal’ levels which are in contrast to the unusually calm 2017.

We have started to see some minor interest rate hikes across the major western economies. As I have written about before, although this could be a bit painful for markets in the short term, it is a very necessary part of our recovery from the decade-old financial crisis and is (at last) a small sign that things are returning to ‘normal’.

Although I will never try to predict what the following year holds (the last 2 or 3 years have taught us to expect surprises, both political and financial if nothing else) it can often be helpful to review the fundamentals of the global economy. I would encourage you to read this article from 7IM which provides some useful insight on the state of play and a calm, rational analysis of things potentially to come in the future.

Regardless of what is happening out there in the world, we remain long term investors. We don’t try to time the markets and we don’t panic when things seem tough.

As I wish you a very Merry Christmas and a happy 2019, I shall leave you with the words of Warren Buffet – a calming influence when the world seems to be going mad:

‘The most common cause of low prices is pessimism – sometimes pervasive, sometimes specific to a company or industry. We want to do business in such an environment, not because we like pessimism but because we like the prices it produces. It is optimism that is the enemy of the rational investor.’

 

"The value of investments and the income from them may fall as well as rise. You may get back less than you originally invested"