Monthly Archives: July 2019

The Balance of Life

“Life is what happens when your busy making other plans” – John Lennon

“I’m busy.”

“Work’s good thanks, it’s busy at the moment.”

“Sorry, we’re busy.”

As human beings we seem to be busy with our busyness and often, if it’s not managed properly, we get out of balance. We’re working too hard. We’re not seeing friends and family as much as we would like. We’re not enjoying the activities that give our lives fulfilment and energise us. We have no time to think – to think about what really matters most.

Achieving balance is a constant push and pull, and deep down you can feel when it is out of kilter. We must constantly reevaluate whether we have the right balance, if we’ve moved too far in one direction, or if we’ve given up on an element completely.

Every single person has a different definition of what they would consider balance. This evolves over different stages of life and as it evolves, so must the individual. My balance will not be the same as anyone else’s, although it may be similar. What constitutes as balance to me may be boredom to you. What I consider a balanced weekend – seeing friends, going to the gym, swimming with the kids, walking to a cafe, popping into my sister’s may be perceived as “too much going on” to someone else.

Friends, pastimes, family, work – when we get them in balance, we enjoy life. It is said that when you’re having fun in life, then you have struck some kind of balance. How many people do you know that have worked so hard for retirement that when they get there they don’t know what to do because working is all they’ve ever done? How many people do you know that are so busy supporting their family that they never actually see them?

Society has got better at addressing these issues and employers and employees are far more aware of work life balance than they were even 10 years ago.

At Buckingham Gate we’re in the business of having our clients reach the right balance.

We hope you have a lovely balanced week.

Tip The First Domino: How One Change Can Lead To A Happier Life

I (Kayleigh) read an article this week and wanted to share it with you. It was posted by Start Living Richly and as the title suggests it shows how one change in your life can create a domino effect resulting in a much happier life. You can read the full article here.

Maybe there could be a change in your life which you haven’t considered?

Maybe there is something you want to change but aren’t quite sure how to do it?

Or maybe you don’t have the confidence to make a change?

This is one of the reasons why I love working at Buckingham Gate. Buckingham Gate really care about our clients and their happiness. One of our biggest sources of pride is giving our clients the confidence to make a change. Whether it be to move house, quit their job, buy a new car or go travelling and so on.

If you think there is something that you might like to change in your life, please get in touch with us as we would be delighted to help you.

The Great Wealth Divide

After clicking on the title of this post, you are probably expecting me to be talking about the gaping chasm between the rich and poor in our society or across the world.

Perhaps I might mention the huge wealth inequality between young and old or the huge differences in wealth levels across different parts of the world.

Well, I am sorry to disappoint you, but I write to you today with a much more balanced and well-informed world view.

You see, I have been reading a book called ‘Factfulness’ by Hans Rosling, a man who dedicated his life to correcting the fundamental misconceptions that human beings have about the world.

I must point out that I am only 1 chapter in, but already the book has changed the shape of my world view about wealth.

In this first chapter, the author points out that the media very much likes to characterise things as two opposite ends of a spectrum. The media also likes to portray the idea of conflict between two groups. Think rich vs poor, good vs evil, small business vs huge corporations, the man on the street vs the government. You get the idea.

The reason the media do this (according to years of academic research by the author) is twofold; 1. Because characterising things using two extremes portrays a sense of drama and excitement, things which get us to consume media and 2. Because human beings love things to be simple and having just 2 options makes things easy to understand.

However, when it comes to wealth and living standards (which is largely the topic of chapter 1), things are not so simple. Hans Rosling advocates that we think of wealth across the world and within countries in terms of 4 different levels and not just two extremes.

For example, at wealth level 1, you are living on around $2 a day and have little in the way of basic human needs. You are unlikely to have shoes and will only eat what you can manage to grow. You then progress through wealth level 2 ($8 a day), level 3 (up to $16 a day) and then level 4 (over $32 a day).

The data shows that the vast majority of people across the world live in level 2 and 3. So while the media characterises this ‘gap’ of wealth and inequality across the world, in fact there is simply a range of different options with most people sitting in the middle, exactly where the media tells us the ‘gap’ is supposed to be.

The same can be said in most individual countries as well. In the UK, the vast majority of people will live in group 4 and some in group 3, but yet our media still tells us of this ‘battle’ between the rich and poor, suggesting that there is a huge chasm between them.  However, in truth, there is no chasm, simply a range of people, most of whom are somewhere in the middle.

If you pick the most extreme examples from a set of data, there is always likely to be outliers and extreme examples, but these represent only a minute percentage of the total sample. What you will find in the vast majority of cases is that there is no gap, no chasm – most people are in the middle.

This manipulation of data is one of the ever-growing list of reasons why the media is not a good source of reliable information about the world (and by extension investments or the health of our economy).

My other gripe with the media is that they like to peddle a largely negative world view. They like to tell us that things are getting worse. However, the data shows that by almost any meaningful measure of human progress, health, living standards and prosperity, the world is getting better. Exponentially, dramatically better.

I have probably not done this excellent book (or the first chapter anyway) justice with my waffle today so I strongly recommend that you read this book.

In the space of 30 pages or so, it is quickly changing my world view and I’m sure it will continue to do so.